Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Yum! And so very easy to make, especially if you have pumpkin seeds from the jack-o-lantern that you carved for Halloween.

I bought two pumpkins post-10/31 for $1.99 each at a local grocery store.  They were Fairy Tale pumpkins, known to be very good for baking.  I didn’t realize how heavy they were – so I now have about 16#s of pureed roasted pumpkin in the freezer for future use throughout the holiday season and winter.  Good thing I like pumpkin!  🙂

Back to the Roasted pumpkin seeds.  It really isn’t difficult to roast them, and they are really good and good for you!

Clean and separate seeds from the “pumpkin guts”.  Don’t throw away the pumpkin guts!  They can be used, just like the pumpkin puree, for pumpkin bread (a post on that soon).

Once cleaned, dry the pumpkin seeds.  Put the seeds in a plastic baggie, add about a teaspoon of olive oil and coat the seeds.  Dump them on a parchment paper lined cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast at 375* for about 20 minutes.  After 10 minutes, mix them up a bit and put back in over for another 10 minutes or so.  Keep an eye on them so they don’t burn.

On a side note – I am interested in any ideas (beyond pie) that anyone may have on what to make with pumpkin.  Drop me a note in the comments with your ideas.  If you have any special recipes, point me in the direction of where I can find them; if they are on your blog, post a link. THANKS!

Pumpkin Seed Pesto

Mmmm, this pumpkin seed pesto sounds wonderful!

SABOR

We humans are a wasteful bunch, especially when it comes to food.  Think about the last time you threw out half an apple or tossed the skins of your soon-to-be-mashed potatoes.  We’ve been unconsciously trained to follow certain formulas when playing in the kitchen: if the recipe doesn’t call for the entire fruit or vegetable, the remainder belongs in the trash.

Let’s use pumpkins as an example.  Every Halloween you buy a few to carve with your children or your tipsy friends.  Newspapers are spread on the floor, ceremonial knives are brandished, and pretty soon the walls are dripping with bright-orange pumpkin guts.  Ninety percent of those guts end up in the trash.  The rest become wallpaper or hair gel, depending on the number of cocktails poured that evening.  Halloween is great.

But every now and then, some culinary genius decides to save the pumpkin guts for future consumption.  Said…

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